Skip to Main Content
It looks like you're using Internet Explorer 11 or older. This website works best with modern browsers such as the latest versions of Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and Edge. If you continue with this browser, you may see unexpected results.

Undergraduate Research

Resources for course-based undergraduate research experiences

Citations

Why do I need to cite?

Citation is a necessary component in conducting great research. To avoid plagiarism, it is not optional. Citation allows: 

  • You to recognize other people's work; and 
  • Your reader to know that the information you're presenting is credible 

While citation is not as easy as: 

 

Image source

it can certainly be made manageable by taking the right steps along the research process, and not leaving until the end of your project. 

Make the Citation Process More Manageable

Step 1: Find the appropriate citation style Step 2: Choose your citation manager

Each subject will have a different citation style that is commonly used. 

Click on each citation style to access the Style Guide created by the Student Success Centre for an overview of each style

Using a citation manager is the most efficient way of managing your citations as it does (most of, if not all) the work for you. 

Two of the free and most commonly used citation managers by students are:

 

Step 3: Cite along the way Step 4: Reference list

Provide in-text citation after every time you use or refer to another person's work in your writing. 

This will save you from the painful task of going through your entire work and trying to remember which content needs to be cited and what work you're supposed to be citing if you leave the citation process until the end. 

If you're using Microsoft Word to write your work, here are instructions for in-text citation specific to the citation managers mentioned in Step 2: 

Most likely, you will be asked to provide a reference list at the end of your work. 

If you used the MS Word plug-in for the citation manager of your choice to insert your in-text citations, you can generate a reference list with a few clicks (i.e., no more typing them all out by hand!)

Note: generating a reference list doesn't need to be reserved at the end of your writing process. You can set it up so that each new in-text citation that you add as you write will be added to the list. 

Click here for a list of Research Guides on citation created by our University of Calgary librarians.

IMPORTANT Take the time to check your in-text citations and reference list manually. While citation managers are efficient, they can still make mistakes!